I love travelling to spectacular places and photographing big mountainscapes or endless dark skies. But I have always lived in big cities. Throughout the years, I have learned to appreciate green urban spaces. When I moved to London, it was no exception. Most people don’t know that London is one of the greenest cities in the world. Almost 40% of the city is public green spaces! Most London parks are free, well-maintained and have excellent access to facilities. London is a famous tourist destination, but most tourists don’t realize that spring is one of the best times to visit the capital. London is home to a versatile collection of flowers from all over the globe. Here are some of the best places in London to capture the bests spring blooms.


Spring in London starts with yellow carpets of daffodils. You can enjoy this spectacular display of colour in St. James’s Park and Green Park. Daffodils can also be photographed with the Elizabeth Tower, commonly known as Big Ben. You’ll find them on the opposite side of the River Thames. Use the focus stacking technique to get the flowers and the tower in focus by taking and blending multiple photos with different focus distances.

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Magnolia trees are a sight to behold! If you head to Notting Hill, you’ll find many of them. The colourful houses near the Portobelo Market offer a fun background for your photos. Look up and play with different vantage points. Magnolias look great against a blue sky, so take advantage of clear or partly cloudy days.


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Notting Hill is one of the most popular locations during springtime. In addition to magnolias, you can also find cherry blossoms all over the neighbourhood. Nothing says spring like cherry blossoms, and London has plenty of them! Some of the first trees to bloom are located inside St. James’s Park. Photograph them immediately before sunset or after sunrise during the golden hour for the best light.

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The most famous cherry blossoms trees in London are probably the ones in Greenwich Park. Walking around the Ranger’s House, you’ll find a stunning path with pink sakura.


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Greenwich Park’s cherry blossoms path also has black garden benches that you can use for your compositions. Make sure to also check The Garden Avenue in Reagent’s Park. This garden is picture-perfect with its Victorian design and elegant fountains. During springtime, you can walk underneath arches of pink cherry blossoms.


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If you are a fan of sakura avenues, add Battersea Park to your list. You will encounter a beautiful wooden gazebo at the end of Cherry Tree Avenue.

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Not all cherry blossoms are pink. For the white sakura lovers, head to London Eye and Tower Bridge and prepare to be pleasantly surprised. The trees surrounding these two icons can offer great photo opportunities when in bloom.


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Cheery blossoms can be pretty delicious! Green parakeets are frequently spotted in different London parks feeding on the buds during the early hours of the day. Parakeets are most active during the morning so aim for sunrise. Use a large focal length and the wide aperture to create a Bokeh effect. This will result in a blurry background and a dreamy look.


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Almost half of the world’s population of bluebells grows in the UK. It’s no surprise that they are pretty popular in London and England. Chalet Wood has to be the place to go for Londoners. Be careful; native bluebells are fragile. Avoid picking or walking on them.


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Isabella Plantation is an explosion of colours during late April/early May. This area of Richmond Park is a labyrinth of azaleas and rhododendrons where you can get easily and happily lost. Use the streams as leading lines and the S-curves from the bushes to improve your compositions.


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Tulips are among the most colourful spring flowers. You can photograph perfectly designed tulip beds inside the appropriately called Holland Park. You can also find tulips in the gardens surrounding the iconic St. Paul’s Cathedral. Place your camera close to the ground to get a low perspective. This angle allows you to get the cathedral and tulips in the same frame.


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Every May, the #wisteriahysteria hashtag takes over social media. Wisteria sets Londoners off in a frenzy. Cascades of purple and blue can be seen in different residential areas such as South Kensington, Notting Hill, and Chelsea. Be respectful and avoid disturbing residents and locals. Wisteria pergolas are a delight to watch and photograph. You can find these hidden gems inside a few parks around town; Peckham Rye Park is one of the most popular.


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Last but not least, you have to pay a visit to Kew Gardens during spring. The Royal Botanic Gardens have more than 15,000 species of plants. If you are looking for a particular flower, I’ll bet you’ll find it there!


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